Contents

The 4 Best 5. 56 Reloading Dies – Reviews 2020 Photo by mr. smashy / CC BY Reloading is a fun and rewarding hobby.

The 4 Best 5.56 Reloading Dies – Reviews 2020 Photo by mr.smashy / CC BY Reloading is a fun and rewarding hobby. The 5.56mm is an incredibly common round to reload due to the popularity of the AR 15 rifle. When reloading, it’s critical you select a set of dies dedicated to your particular rifle since semi-auto rifles have different demands than bolt-action ones. You also need a good set of tough dies; you don’t want anything that will just give out on you in the middle of reloading 1,000 rounds. (For the sake of simplicity, you can use 5.56mm reloading dies for ..223 as well and vice versa. The two rounds have different pressure loadings, but for the dies themselves, they’re interchangeable. See this article for more explanation.) The best dies come from American companies, and I have 4 of the best 5.56 reloading dies below. Hornady Custom Grade Reloading Dies Hornady 546228 DIESET 2 223 REM Remington "Custom Grade Reloading" DIE Set (Series I Two-Die Set) (.224) Price: $24.88 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:13 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. If you are looking to keep things nice and simple, but still want a quality set of dies it is hard to beat this set from Hornady. Hornady is one of the world’s most well known ammunition manufacturers. They produce a wide variety of ammo, including custom match ammunition that is a direct reflection of Hornady quality. This simple die set is designed for mass reloading. These are for the type who shoots a semi-automatic rifle and likes to press out a thousand of so rounds at a time. They are affordable, easy to use, and do the job. While they are affordable and a bit plain, they are far from cheap. Cheap in my mind means crap, and nothing I’ve ever seen from Hornady has ever been crap. Hornady does offer a lifetime warranty and a guarantee that these dies will never break or even wear from reloading 5.56mm and ..223 ammunition. Again these are plain dies, but they do feature Hornady’s Zip spindle. The Zip spindle is a somewhat new to the Hornady dies, and keeps you from smashing your hand while trying to tighten the spindle lock. It also keeps the spindle from slipping, which makes spindle adjustments much easier. Resize, reload, recrimp and get ready to go, preferably in a safe manner. These Plain Jane dies just might be the best 5.56 reloading dies you can buy. RCBS Small Base (SB) Die Set .223/5.56 RCBS 11107 .223 Rem/5.56 x 45 SB T/C Die Set Price: $63.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:13 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. RCBS doesn’t have the ammunition production claim to fame that Hornady has, but they do have a claim to fame when it comes to reloading supplies. They’ve been doing it for about 60 years, which means they have a good handle on what they are doing. The RCBS kit we have here for the 5.56 and .223 are specifically designed for AR shooters. This makes sense; the AR probably eats more .223 and 5.56 ammunition than any other weapon in the world. The RCBS dies are designed for the progressive reloader who is trying to pump out a large amount of ammunition in a shorter period of time. With this set of dies you get a full length, small base sizing die and a taper crimp seating die. This set of dies is guaranteed to size the brass consistently to ensure chambering performance and accuracy. The taper crimp seating die is designed to give you a little leeway in a safe manner but to give you that wiggle room when crimping cases that may be a little shorter or a little longer. This die set is also very affordable. At that price you are getting a very tough set of dies, backed by a very nice warranty. These dies are designed to be long lasting though, and used thousands and thousands of times. Reloading 101: "Small Base" Resizing Die for AR-15 .223 Ammo Watch this video on YouTube

Best .22LR Rimfire Ammo [2020]: Accuracy, Plinking, & Hunting

Best .22LR Rimfire Ammo [2020]: Accuracy, Plinking, & Hunting

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Most people’s first time shooting is with a .22LR firearm. Fully Upgraded 10/22 But what .22LR ammo do you choose? There are dozens, even hundreds of brands and types, so what is the best one? Popular .22LR Ammo Is there a best one? As with any other type of ammo, what .22LR you buy depends on what you want to do with it. .22LR (CCI vs Winchester vs Super Colibri) But don’t worry, I’ll walk through my favorite rounds for cheap plinking, hunting, accuracy, and even going subsonic. Best .22LR Ammo For Plinking We’ll start off with the cheapest ammo that will run reliably in semi-auto rifles and pistols.  As you know if you’ve shot any .22, the ammo can be a little finicky even when you’re shooting the “best” brands. Centerfire vs Rimfire Primer We run into trouble with some ammo since it lacks the *oomph* to cycle the bolt in semi guns. Look for “good” prices around 5-8 cents each.  I think the days of sub-5 cent rounds are long behind us. Vortex Venom Mounted on Buckmark And since .22 LR hasn’t become plentiful yet, I’m including a couple links for each recommendation since they might not be in stock. 1. Remington Thunderbolt Usually, the cheapest rounds…but some guns don’t like them.  Mine have no complaints but I read enough about them that I would test them out first before taking the plunge and stacking deep. Remington Thunderbolt 33 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 33 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 2. Federal Auto Match 325 rounds of affordable .22 LR that’s mostly available nowadays.  No complaints in my bolts or semi’s. "Federal Auto Match" 20.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20.99 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 3. Federal Champion What I’ve shot the most and have in storage the deepest. For hunting, the name of the game is to get a quick/clean kill without making too much of the meat inedible.  Usually, this means going with a high velocity and hollow point (HP) bullet. Federal Champion 28.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28.99 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing For Hunting 4. CCI Stinger The gold standard in small game hunting.  Fast, accurate, and deadly with its copper-plated 32-grain hollow point bullet.  Can’t go wrong with this one and has enough oomph to cycle semi’s. CCI Stinger 6.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 6.99 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. CCI Velocitor Cool name…cool round.  I like my CCI’s and the newer Velocitor brings a tad heavier round (40 gr) to the mix at just a tad slower velocity than the Stinger.  Slightly harder to find. I’ve found the most accurate ammo also has a much better ignition rate compared to the plinking rounds.  If you also want reliability…go with these. Day At The Range .22 LR Accuracy Test CCI Velocitor 6 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 6 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 6. CCI Standard Velocity One of my favorite all-around loads in terms of price and reliability.  And apparently the most accurate according to Day At The Range. CCI Standard Velocity 7 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 7 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What’s your take on CCI? Readers' Ratings 4.92/5 (623) Your Rating? For Accuracy 7. RWS Target Rifle I’m unfamiliar with this brand but the results speak for themselves.  Let me know how it shoots for you! RWS Target Rifle 8.99 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8.99 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing 8. Wolf Match Target I was surprised at this one…Wolf always works but I never saw it as accurate. "Wolf Match Target" 8.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing 9. Norma TAC-22 I like this one since it works very well in my semi-auto guns like the 10/22 and .22 LR AR-clones. If you’ve got a suppressor or want to be a little quieter…going subsonic is the way to go.  It sounds like a cap gun instead of having the * CLAP * of a faster-than-sound bullet. Norma TAC-22 53.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 53.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Subsonic Rounds 10. CCI Subsonic HP My favorite overall subsonic round.  Accuracy and reliability of CCI and not so slow (1050 fps) that it can’t run on semi’s. CCI Subsonic HP 6 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 6 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 11. Norma T-22 You’ll be hard pressed to find someone who speaks ill of Norma ammo.  This one is no exception.  Should be able to run on semi’s (1017 fps). Norma T-22 82.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 82.99 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing 12. Aguila Super Colibri Powder?  Who needs powder? These rounds run off only the primer so they are super-quiet and super slow (420 fps).  Won’t run in your semi though. "Aguila Super Colibri" 5 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 5 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Conclusion So there you have it…our roundup of the best .22LR for plinking, hunting, accuracy, and even sub-sonic. Did we miss any that you really think belongs here?  Let us know! If you’re looking for a new .22LR, take a look at the 7 Best .22 LR Rifles ! And for more calibers check out Best Places to "Buy Ammo Online" . More Popular Ammo Brands

Gun Collecting: The Venerable Thompson Submachine Gun

Gun Collecting: The Venerable Thompson Submachine Gun

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2d7420d_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2d7420d_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } This nearly mint example of a Thompson Model of 1921 was manufactured by Colt's in Hartford, Connecticut. With only about 2,400 Thompson submachine guns in a transferable state today, the price for one of these beauties reaches well into five digits. These beautiful images are from the National Firearms Museum, and are featured in the full-color 16-page center section of the 2013 Standard Catalog of Firearms . The first Thompsons to come to market were the Model 1921s, manufactured by Colt Patent Firearms for Auto Ordnance Corporation in New York, New York. Between March 1921 and April 1922 15,000 guns were built. Of those 15,000 manufactured, only about 2,400 weapons exist in a transferable state today, “transferable” meaning weapons that can be bought, sold, or traded legally within the U.S. Originally made with 20-round magazines, eventually 30-round stick magazines and 50- and 100-drum magazines were manufactured for use on “the gun that made the '20s roar.” Three models of the Model 1921 were produced. The Model 1921A had a fixed front sight and a rate of fire of 800 rounds per minute. The Model 1921AC has a Cutts compensator instead of a fixed front sight and an 800-rounds-per-minute rate of fire. The Model 1928 Navy was fitted with a Cutts compensator and a heavier actuator that reduced the rate of fire to 600 rounds per minute. All of these Navy models had the number “8” stamped crudely over the number “1” on the left side of the receiver. Of the 15,000 Colt Model 1921s produced, approximately 25 percent were Model 1921As, 33 percent were Model 1921ACs, and 41 percent were 1928 Navys. A handful of Model 1927s were manufactured by Colt and left the factory as semi-automatics. However, the ATF considers these guns machine guns and requires that all NFA rules apply. These Model 1927s are quite rare and represent only about one percent of total production. They do not seem to sell for the same dollar figures that the machine guns do. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Photo Gallery: Engraved and Custom Guns of Gun Digest 2016 All Colt-manufactured Thompsons were bright blued; none were parkerized. All had walnut stocks, grips, and forearms manufactured by Remington. With the exception of a few prototypes, all Colt Thompsons were chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. All internal parts were nickel plated and all barrels were finned. All weapons had a Lyman rear sight assembly. A removable rear stock was standard. All weapons were marked with a “new york, usa” address on the right side of the receiver. “Colt patent firearms” was marked on the left side of the receiver. These Colt Thompsons would accept a 20- or 30-round box magazine as well as a 50-round “L” drum or 100 round “C” drum. Weight is about 10.75 lbs.

Commanders, Defenders and Officers Model 1911s

Commanders, Defenders and Officers Model 1911s

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377ec388e6c_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377ec388e6c_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Top to bottom, the popular concealed carry barrel lengths – 4.25-inch, 4-inch and 3-inch. If there is a legitimate criticism of the 1911 as a carry gun, it is size and weight. But the 1911 is also available in smaller size configurations known as the Commanders, Defenders and Officers Model 1911s. Choosing from among these models you'll be sure to find a pistol to match your needs. If there is a legitimate criticism of the 1911 as a carry gun, it is size and weight. The pistol is thin but long and heavy. Do not let anyone convince you the 1911 is dated. It is simply from another era in which handguns were designed to save your life and were not based on liability concerns. The pistol is designed to be as fast as a good boxer, with a well timed and devastating blow foremost. The Colt Commander is the result of a desire for a lighter and handier 1911. While the story goes the Commander was designed to offer the military a downsized pistol, there had been prototypes of a short .45 kicking around Hartford before World War II. The use of aircraft grade aluminum for the frame allowed a very light and handy concealment piece. The Commander retains the full size grip of the Government Model. This allows comfortable firing and a good sharp draw. Size has much to do with confidence and control. Although it is appreciably lighter than the Government Model, the Commander is a controllable handgun – with practice. These choices are pretty simple. They are all aluminum frame pistols with barrel lengths of (top to bottom) 5, 4 and 3 inches. With the Series 70 production run the Combat Commander Colt was introduced. This is simply a steel frame Commander. The Combat Commander is now known as simply the Commander while the aluminum frame Commander is the LW Commander. The steel frame Commander offers excellent balance. The problem with reducing the length of the pistol as far as reliability was the higher slide velocity, which was addressed by spring technology. But then we also had a shorter spring that had to exert more pressure. The shortened slide length reduces the total reciprocating mass but also alters the way the magazine presents the round to the breech face. In the end, it was a wonder the Commander was so reliable. It’s a great pistol. Related GunDigest Articles Stevens Introduces 12-Gauge Model 320 Waterfowl Shotgun Winchester Offers New Model 1873 Sporter Stevens Introduces Model 320 12-Gauge Turkey Shotgun Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The Officer’s Model was the original short 1911, with a 3.5-inch barrel and grip shortened enough to cut magazine capacity by one round. Today most compact pistols have 3-inch barrels. "The Officer’s Model" demanded considerable revision of the design but the 3-inch pistols even more so. In order to accommodate the sharper barrel tilt in a short slide pistol, the barrel no longer used a barrel bushing. The Commander used a standard bushing, although it was shortened. The Defender features a belled barrel that contacts the slide directly. One of the standard 1911 locking lugs was removed in order to allow the barrel to recoil proportionately more to the rear of the pistol. These design changes were essential in order to produce a functioning short slide handgun. The 3-inch idiom has proven very popular. The Officer’s Model is now out of production and seems unlikely to return. These three idioms – the Government Model, the Commander and the Officer’s Model – were once the defining descriptor of 1911 frame and slide sizes. Today Government Model, Commander and Defender are more apt descriptions of the increasingly popular compact and ultra-compact descriptions. A new and very popular handgun is the 4-inch barrel 1911. Some of the best of the modern 1911s are 4-inch guns. These include the Kimber Pro Carry, the Kimber CDP, the Para TAC FOUR and the Springfield Champion. The 4-inch barrel 1911s are more in line in size and weight with the popular service pistols from other makers such as the SIG P226 or Glock Model 23. They are superior service pistols and take much drag off of the uniform belt. They are also ideal concealed carry pistols. They are available in both aluminum frame and steel frame versions in weight ranging from about 26 to 33 ounces. These pistols feature the belled barrel type lockup as they are too short to utilize a barrel bushing properly. In my experience these are very reliable handguns. They clear leather quickly, get on target quickly, and offer excellent hit potential. They also rate high on the smile test, with most raters reacting favorably to the handling and accuracy potential of these handguns. While heavier than some pistols, the steel frame Commander is very controllable and well balanced. A LW frame 1911 is not for non-dedicated personnel. The pistol demands attention to detail and proper technique to master. I find the lightweight 4-inch barrel 1911 easier to control than a polymer frame .40 caliber pistol, but there is time and effort in the equation. The difference is that you will be able to reach a high level of competence with the 1911 that may elude shooters using the polymer frame pistols. The 4-inch pistol certainly falls into the ‘if I could have only one pistol’ category. It is that versatile. At this point you may reasonably ask for a recommendation on which 1911 is best for you. My recommendation is always to begin with a steel frame 5-inch barrel Government Model. I might add that it is best to purchase the best quality handgun you can afford for a good return on performance and future trade-in.

6 Tools to Survive Anything

Some tools are so versatile you can’t even begin to list all of the things they are useful for. In fact, 9 times out of 10, you won’t even know what you’ll need them for until it happens. Here are the 6 tools every self respecting prepper should have in large quantities and always available. Quick Navigation 1. Duct Tape 2. Zip Ties 3. WD40 4. Rope 5. Knife 6. Pry Bar What Else? 1. Duct Tape The fame of duct tape has taken on a life of it’s own. What can you even say about it? (or it’s big brother Gorilla Tape , from the folks that brought you Gorilla Glue) 2. Zip Ties From handcuffs to lashings and a thousand other ways to tie stuff together, you should have a stockpile of zip ties in every shape and size. 3. WD40 “If it moves and it shouldn’t; use Duct Tape.  If it should move and it doesn’t; use WD40” 4. Rope For those larger jobs that zip ties and duct tape just aren’t going to handle good rope is endlessly useful. 5. Knife A knife is the bread and butter (pun intended) of every survival tool kit. You really should have one on your person at all times. 6. Pry Bar or Utility Bar. You can pry, hammer, lift, smash, and just generally mess stuff up. (I need to do a full write up on the Stanley Functional Utility Bar or “FUBAR”) What Else? What other tools are so useful? So manly? If you have others you think should be on this list leave a comment and let us know. Also read “6 Dangerous Urban Survival Myths About Water” Photo by: Myxi Other interesting articles: Teenage Survival Part 2: Tools How can the ShamWOW help you Survive? 10 Non-Power Tools You Need for Survival Female Self Defense: 7 Weapons You Need to Survive

NightForce vs Leupold Scopes – Which Are Better? (ANSWERED) Photo by Brian Bennett / CC BY When you think of great scopes, I mean truly great rifle scopes, the kind that you cannot even look at for under four figures, NightForce and Leupold are going to be two names that quickly come to mind. And for damn good reason. Both companies have an unquestionable reputation for high end, top quality rifle scopes. These are the scopes you buy if you are a hardened professional shooter needing the absolute top quality optic or to top off your custom dream rifle with worthy glass. On that hypothetical (or real) high-end rifle, the trigger is smooth and breaks like glass the same spot every time, the barrel comes from a custom maker and has been carefully built to ensure the most exacting accuracy, the stock fits you perfectly, and the whole thing is finished exactly how you want it. Now what to put on top? Certainly not an ordinary scope but which one? There are so many, and often people find themselves asking “Which is better in a battle of NightForce vs Leupold ?” Well, like the eternal 9mm vs .45 debate, it is a question that cannot be truly answered, but you can have a heck of a lot of fun asking it. Round 1 – NightForce vs Leupold: Leupold Mark 4 vs NightForce SHV Leupold Mark 4 ER/T 6.5-20x50mm (30mm) M5 Front Focal TMR Rifle Scope Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 08:28 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Nightforce Optics 5-20x56 SHV Riflescope, Matte Black with Illuminated Moar Second Focal Plane Reticle, Side Parallax Focus, 0.25 MOA, 30mm Tube Diameter, Zeroset Turrets Price: $1,335.00 Price as of 08/13/2020 22:03 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Let’s look at price, design, and features. Both scopes feature an illuminated reticle, so we can get that out of the way. An illuminated reticle is simply the only way to go if you are even thinking about shooting in low light conditions, and both these beauties offer that. Now for the price, the NightForce ( see the full line here ) usually wins, but I’d argue if you are looking for scopes in this price range, a few hundred bucks won’t make much of a difference, but I’ll give the nod to the NightForce here. The Leupold has a 30mm tube, with 6.5 to 20 power magnification and a 50mm objective lens. Pretty solid stuff there. Compare with the NightForce and its 5-20 magnification, 30mm tube, and 56mm objective lens. Conclusion? Run with the NightForce if you don’t mind a slightly larger front objective lens and the possible issues with mounting it on your rifle. Round 2 – NightForce vs Leupold: Leupold VX-6 vs NightForce ATACR Leupold VX-6HD 3-18x50mm Riflescope (171572) Price: $1,799.99 Price as of 08/13/2020 17:32 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Nightforce Optics 5-25x56 ATACR Riflescope, Matte Black with F1 DigIllum Illuminated First Focal Plane MOAR Reticle, "Side Parallax Focus" , 34mm Tube Diameter Price: $3,100.00 Price as of 08/14/2020 05:57 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Once again, both scopes feature an illuminated reticle, so they are happily even there. On price, well, that gets interesting. The Nightforce is usually more than the Leupold (though check current prices since there are fluctuations). In all fairness, however, the ATACR is one amazing rifle scope. The ATACR shows its tactical origins, while the more modestly priced VX-6, like most Leupold scopes, is strictly sporting in origin. Each is at home on top of a high end AR and both fill a similar role. Having said that, the VX-6 sports a 30mm tube with a 50mm objective lens and 3-18 power magnification, and the ATCAR has the same 30mm tube with somewhat greater 5-25 magnification and an oversized 56mm objective lens. Conclusion. If cash is king then buy Leupold ( see the full line here ). If you can throw money around like Donald Trump, though, by all means buy the NightForce. Other than the cost, the practical differences between the two scopes is such that only a highly advanced shooter could care, but if you are in that elevated realm, the conclusion of NightForce is obvious. Leupold and NightForce Side by Side Leupold is the old man in the game. A venerable, century-old company in Oregon, Leupold has been building high end rifle scopes since after WWII, and many a soldier, sportsman, and target shooter have enjoyed the quality and performance Leupold has to offer. In fact, they’ve built their entire identity around two things: tradition and quality. Leupold caters to sportsmen and the quiet sort of professional who respects a well established name. Particularly among American hunters, Leupold is the first and last name they will consider when looking at high end optics. It’s simply a matter of tradition and reputation, both of which Leupold has in spades. NightForce is the new, brash kid on the block who has some pretty hardcore gear to back up the attitude. Born of Australian hunting tradition, where nighttime hunting with spotlights is both legal and wildly popular, NightForce built scopes worthy of the Australian outback with low light shooting conditions in mind. They have quickly developed a reputation for rock solid, precise long range scopes, and their designs show it. Massive 56mm objective lenses, oversized 30mm tubes, and the sort of precision adjustments that will let you see and shoot off a mosquito’s private parts at half a mile are the order of the day. So which is better in the battle between NightForce scopes vs Leupold optics? Honestly, I’d leap at the chance to own a scope from either company. Without a doubt, if you are into high end tactical scopes, NightForce makes the best. Their optics are designed around a shooting culture that doesn’t exist in the US but built so as to be extremely desirable for tactical purposes, but equally functional for hunting or sport shooting. Everything about them revolves around precision, magnification and low light conditions. Leupold makes scopes for American hunters, and one could even argue they have defined that market to an extent. Somewhat more modestly priced, they are also a bit more modest in features. We don’t hunt deer by spotlights in this country (well, unless you are a redneck poacher) and Leupold has a well-established market base and serves that market very well. In the end, if you want the absolute biggest and baddest, or just to be different, buy a NightForce scope. You’ll be pleased. If you are more conservative in your tastes, and want to enjoy the same scope several generations of American shooters have, run with Leupold. Either way, you are getting an incredible scope built to the highest standards of quality. Boyd Smith Owner of Reloaderaddict.com, Boyd Smith is a major handgun enthusiast, and although he owns Glocks, he prefers the revolving wheel type.  His go-to guns are a Smith & Wesson 642 Performance Center for carry and a Ruger GP100 in the nightstand biometric safe (he has kids).  He loads both revolvers with old-school 148-grain Federal Gold Medal .38 wadcutters.  It’s OK if you think he’s a wimp. Email him . Share the Post and Images Related Posts Vortex Scopes vs Leupold -- Which Are Better? (ANSWERED) ACOG vs Scopes – Which Is Better? (ANSWERED) Spotting Scopes vs. Binoculars – Which Are Better? (ANSWERED)

Summary

The 4 Best 5. 56 Reloading Dies – Reviews 2020 Photo by mr. smashy / CC BY Reloading is a fun and rewarding hobby.